More than Shyness: Identifying Social Anxiety Disorder

Everyone feels anxious sometimes. It’s very normal. In fact, anxiety has a useful purpose in our lives; it keeps us safe. When we’re anxious, our bodies set off a reaction called the flight-or-flight response, and this causes changes in our bodies… faster heartbeat, trembling hands, shallow breathing, focused thinking. These changes help us act quickly when we need to, to protect ourselves -like staying away from a wild animal!

Read More
More than Shyness: Identifying Social Anxiety Disorder 2018-09-17T13:27:03+00:00

When Anxiety Causes Physical Symptoms

“Mommy, I have a tummy ache.” It’s a sentence every parent will hear from their child sooner or later. Usually, with simple home care and rest, the tummy ache will quickly pass. But in some cases, stomachaches and other symptoms–such as frequent headaches, recurring nausea, diarrhea, dizziness, sweats and flushing–keep returning. Physical causes, from bacteria to viruses to food allergies or even lactose intolerance, are often the trigger. However, if the pediatrician has performed a thorough exam and found a child in good health, it’s possible that underlying anxiety is setting off the complaints.

Read More
When Anxiety Causes Physical Symptoms 2018-09-17T11:10:07+00:00

Expert Guidance for You and Your Anxious Child

Learning the difference between a psychologist, psychiatrist, and social worker or understanding clinical terms such as cognitive–behavioral therapy can be overwhelming. Finding the right resources is critical to addressing a child’s mental health needs and moving forward toward effective care.

In How to Find Mental Health Care for Your Child, seasoned child psychologist and author Ellen B. Braaten offers clear and expert guidance to help anxious parents navigate the complexities of mental health care.

About the Author

When Asking For Reassurance Means “I’m Anxious”

It is typical for kids to have worries and to ask their parents questions about those worries. For example, it is not uncommon for a child to worry about a natural disaster befalling their town after learning about one on the news. It’s also typical and appropriate for a child to then ask their parents about the likelihood of a similar disaster occurring in their own hometown. However, some children are not satisfied by having their question answered once or twice.

Read More
When Asking For Reassurance Means “I’m Anxious” 2018-09-06T15:25:11+00:00
Illustrations of children riding a bicycle, meditating, and playing